Social Media In A Tragedy

By on Jan 07, 2017

Category: Social Media

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Yesterday, a shooting took place not too far from here – at the Fort Lauderdale Airport.  Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families of the five people who needlessly lost their lives.  For the eight others injured, we pray for their total recovery.  For those of us who live here, having something like this happen in our own backyard is unsettling to say the least.

Unfortunately in life, bad things happen – acts of mankind, like yesterday’s shooting, and acts of nature like hurricanes, earthquakes and tornadoes.   We often hear negative things about Social Media (it’s too time-consuming, it keeps people from learning to interact on a one-to-one personal basis, etc.) and some of the criticism is warranted.  However, one of the pluses regarding Social Media is that it provides more ways of communication for those not at the location of such events.  Social Media allows others to be informed about the safety of their friends and family, quickly and efficiently.

Facebook, for instance, offers a service that allows its users to inform all of their Facebook friends that they are okay during one of these events.  As you can see from the photo above, I received a message yesterday about one of my friends who lives in the Fort Lauderdale area.  (I’ve removed her picture and name to protect her privacy.)  Another Social Media platform that does well during storms, tragedies, etc., is Twitter.  Again, sending a Tweet is a fast and efficient way of letting everyone who follows you know that you’re okay.  Additionally, there may be times where phone calls won’t go through because of heavy cell tower usage but data will get through, so a Tweet is a great solution.  You could text all your family and friends but that could be a time-consuming venture while a Tweet can reach hundreds (or more) of people.

Again, our hearts go out to all those affected by yesterday’s event at the airport.

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